The Economist

The Economist

THE ECONOMIST
Maybe weary of its role as a punchbag for moralists, and certainly in search of products with widespread appeal, Wall Street has taken to selling products linked to virtue. That is not easy: how does an industry focused on financial returns go about gauging goodness?

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Quartz

Quartz

QUARTZ
More and more, shoppers today want to know their products were made ethically and sustainably, and clothing is one category they’ve put under particular scrutiny.  H&M’s newly launched label, Arket, and its website, which went live on Aug. 25, gives the location and name of the factory where each and every piece of clothing was made.

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Washington Post

WASHINGTON POST
Fashion companies’ websites are a rhetorical jungle of vague, virtuous-sounding self-description. As they boast of “ethical sourcing” and “positive impact,” the companies seek to reassure consumers and investors of brands’ commitments to “transparency” and “sustainability” — two of the most fashionable buzzwords in modern marketing. 

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FastCoDesign/construction

CO.DESIGN
Using the Center's latest report on the Construction industry, Kelsey Campbell-Dollaghan details the complexity of the global construction industry–and its role in the systematic abuse of workers in the Gulf region, which draws millions of people from South Asian countries with the lure of work on skyscrapers, arenas, and other construction projects.

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