Quick Facts

Value of construction projects completed across the GCC, 2014

Value of construction projects completed across the GCC, 2014

Remittances migrant workers sent to developing countries, 2011

Remittances migrant workers sent to developing countries, 2011

Height in feet of Dubai's Burj Khalifa, the tallest structure in the world

Height in feet of Dubai's Burj Khalifa, the tallest structure in the world

 

From the Blog

 
 
Construction.jpg

Every year, millions of migrant workers leave their homes to pursue jobs and economic opportunity in the booming global construction industry.

With limited employment alternatives in their home countries, migrant workers seek opportunities abroad that allow them and their families to move out poverty. But these workers often operate in a gray zone between home and host country protections that leave them vulnerable to exploitation, especially in the recruitment process. Some recruitment agencies charge workers exorbitant fees - in some cases an amount equal to a year's salary - to place them in construction jobs abroad. After they migrate, workers can encounter poor working conditions, unpaid or underpaid wages, or the inability to leave the country or change jobs without their employer's permission.


 
Migrants are an asset to every country where they bring their labor. Let us give them the dignity they deserve as human beings and the respect they deserve as workers.
— Juan Somavía, former Director-General, International Labor Organization
 

What the Center is Doing

The Center launched a project on migrant labor in Gulf construction in September 2015. Through a mix of original research, convening, and advocacy, the project will investigate and make recommendations for improving labor recruitment practices in South Asia and the Arabian Gulf, with a focus on high-profile construction projects such as the World Cup and the cultural and academic institutions on Saadiyat Island. We view recruitment as a central, underlying, and exacerbating factor contributing to the well-documented abuse of construction workers’ human rights.

The Center will publish a report based on original research about recruiting practices in 2016 and will convene several meetings of key stakeholders throughout 2016 and 2017. David Segall leads the Center's work on migrant labor.


 
 

Photos from David Segall's 2015 fact finding mission in India

 
 
 
 
 

The Institute for Human Rights and Business' Dhaka Principles are  intended to enhance respect for migrant workers in global recruitment.

[ See the principles ]